Fiddler’s Hall

In the late 19th century, two men were engaged in a bitter feud after they began courting the same woman. One man decided to scare the other late at night, hiding in a tree and armed with a fiddle. When the other suitor walked up the path to the house, the man in the tree started to play frightening noises on his instrument. While the prank was indeed successful, the fiddler met his fate after slipping from the tree and breaking his neck. Today, sounds of his phantom fiddling can be heard in the area.

Farm House in Mercer County

The farm house in Mercer County, Aledo, Illinois has been known to have the closet door open when it is latched, and have the pull-chain light in the attic turn on by itself. No matter the time of day, the activity occurs randomly.

Hickory Hill (The Old Slave House)

John Hart Crenshaw was an entrepreneur in the salt mining industry during the early 1800s in southern Illinois. Due to the dangers of mining the mineral, he struggled to find labor for his mines. Slavery was illegal in Illinois, but one small loophole in the law made it possible to “lease” slaves; Crenshaw did just this. However, he started kidnapping freed men and women and runaway slaves, either putting them to work in his salt mines or up for sale.

In 1817, John Hart Crenshaw married Sinia Taylor, and started building her a better home in the 1830s. He names the three-story mansion Hickory Hill. Unbeknownst the outside world, however, was a secret passageway that allowed for wagons to bring slaves directly into the house, as well as a tunnel that connected the basement to the Saline River to unload slaves brought by boat.

Mom’s Restaurant

Mom’s Restaurant in Marceline, Missouri has had a number of odd reports over the years, including a cold draft, plates being thrown off of shelves, and furniture being tipped over or turned upside down. The apparition of a woman known as “the Lady in White” has been seen as well.

N Willow House

The N Willow House in Douglass, Kansas has had reports of paranormal activity for several decades. Windows shutter up when no one is there; the bathroom door will slam shut or fly open. On the second floor of the house, footsteps can be heard pacing, making the floorboards creek.

Cicero, Kansas

Cicero, Kansas was founded some time during the late 1800s, lying just four miles north and two miles east of Wellington, Kansas in Sumner County. Originally, it had two wooden grain elevators, a town hall, around four houses, and a store with a post office. A one-room school house was located 1/2 mile west of Cicero.