Saint James Church

The Saint James Church has an odd fog that surrounds it at night. Inside, there is a mysterious light that appears when no one is inside. Adjacent to the church is a small cemetery; those who drive by temporarily have scrambled radio and cell phone signals. It was demolished in October 2003 after two local teens set the structure on fire.

Camp Lulu

Camp Lulu in Brownsville, Texas was opened as a summer camp for young children. However, the nice getaway quickly turned sour after a counselor went insane and proceeded to rape and kill the girls. Now, the sounds of girls crying can be heard at night. The property owner works to preserve the souls of the young girls and shoots at anyone who trespasses.

Poor Farm in Greenfield, Pennsylvania

Before the poor farm was built, there was a house on the same spot. During the Civil War, it was used as part as the Underground Railroad and was later converted into a nursing home. However, the building burned to the ground. The nearby intersection was nicknamed the “Four Corners of the Spiritual World”, as there were four corners with four different locations that seemed to make up the setting of most of the town’s inhabitants’ lives.

On one corner, there was a carnival that would take place, which residents would visit before going to the church, located on another corner. When they got old, they would go to the poor farm, on a third corner, which was proceeded by the fourth and final corner – the cemetery.

One day, the owner of the house asked his neighbor to keep an eye on it while he was gone – he never returned. Eventually, the house was sold, and the new owners made plans to renovate the place. While working on it, the construction crew was troubled by hauntings, and they were forced to walk out on the job. The owners then came to the decision to build a new house slightly behind the old location.

The poor farm is home to both benign and malevolent spirits; the most sighted evil spirit is a shadowy man who runs atop the building.  On some nights, apparitions of rooms that don’t exist anymore appear. The paranormal activity is heightened by the local witches who practice their craft nearby.

Cry Baby Bridge

When a woman thought her two children were possessed by the devil, she drove them to Cry Baby Bridge to kill them. She drove over the bridge, killing both she and her kids. Witnesses report that if you park your car atop the bridge, roll down your windows, and honk three times, children’s voices can be heard yelling “Don’t do it, mother!”

Third Bridge

The Third Bridge is said to have been the site of a massacre of Native Americans that resulted in several deaths. Because of this, the sound of war drums can be heard growing louder and louder as visitors sit on the bridge. Another apparition said to appear along the bridge is a ghost horse rider, who rides on the bridge.

In June 1997, a group of fifteen teenagers and one pre-teen spread between two cars decided to see the paranormal activity at the bridge for themselves. The first vehicle lost control at the top of the hill and crashed into the guardrail. After witnessing the accident, the driver of the second car made a desperate attempt to break but instead hit the gas pedal. They were forced into a tree, smashing the vehicle. The aftermath of the accident left two teens dead and the driver of the first car with permanent crippling injuries.

Third Bridge is haunted by both the dead teenagers and Native American victims.

Arkansas River (Pueblo, Colorado)

The Arkansas River in Pueblo, Colorado has been the site of a number of deaths. In more recent years, several Native American burial sites have been discovered along the banks of the river. Those who walk along the adjacent Pueblo Nature Trail have reported feelings of unease and the constant sensation of being watched or followed.

Lake Shawnee Amusement Park

In 1775, the first European settlers, led by Mitchell Clay, arrived in Princetown, West Virginia. Clay and his family worked together in farming on the land that would later become the Lake Shawnee Amusement Park. Their seemingly safe new life took a tragic turn in 1783. While the men were away hunting, Clay’s two children, Bartley and Tabitha, were attacked by Native Americans in the area. Bartley was murdered and scalped, and Tabitha was killed while trying to save her brother. Their younger brother, Ezekiel, was later kidnapped by the tribe. The men returned to find the children missing, and they took off after the third child.

The Natives took Ezekiel to Ohio, where they proceeded to burn his body at the stake shortly before the rescue group could catch up to them. After defeating the warriors, the search party took strips of skin off the Native Americans’ backs to use as razor straps; the trophies remained in the Clay family for years to come. The chief permitted Mitchell Clay to take the body of his son back home to be buried. The bodies of Bartley and Tabitha were exhumed so that they could be relocated to the hill behind the farmhouse where Ezekiel had been buried.

Two centuries later in 1926, C.T. Snidow purchased the property and turned it into Lake Shawnee Amusement Park; he was entirely unaware of the dark history that lingered on the site. The features of the park included a swimming pool, carnival rides, concession stands, a racetrack, a dance hall, occasional Wild West shows, and guest cabins. Very quickly, it became a popular summer vacation for families.

Tragedy struck again after a mother dropped her son off at the park one morning. When she returned later that afternoon, she found her son’s limp, lifeless body floating in the pool. In order to prevent any further accidents, the owners filled the pool with sand. A few years went by peacefully without any more accidents. During the early 1950s, a truck delivering soda to a drink concession stand accidentally backed up into the path of a swing ride operating at a high speed. The truck collided with one of the swings, killing the young girl riding in it. The fatalities caused the park to close in 1966.

Gaylord White, a former employee of the park, bought the abandoned Lake Shawnee Amusement Park in 1985 with plans to divide up the land and sell it as residential lots. However, his investment plan went south when he found a number of Native American burial sites and artifacts. Instead, he reopened the amusement park – but it only lasted for three years.

After some research, archaeologists discovered that two separate Native American settlements surrounded the area around Lake Shawnee before any European settlers arrived. In 1988, both the Marshall and Concord Colleges worked on digging around the area. They found that the settlements were arranged in a circular formation, and they were inhabited for a long period of time. However, they were believed to have been abandoned several hundreds of years before the settlers arrived. During their study, they found thirteen skeletons, most of them belonging to young children. There are as many as three thousand bodies buried on the property.

Today, the Ferris wheel, the swings, and several other rides remain at the park, which is haunted by a number of spirits. Paranormal activity includes orbs, disembodied voices and footsteps, Native American chanting, odd sounds, and the defunct carnival rides moving by themselves. A male apparition has been seen several times on one of the Ferris wheel cars (the one at the 9 o’clock position). The swings are said to have cold spots just above the wooden seats, which are known to move on their own.

Gaylord White reported having felt someone touching his shoulder or his arm from behind several times while working at the park. He also had a feeling of a presence washing him at the park. However, his most notable interaction was when he was clearing out brush from the field with his tractor shortly after purchasing the property. While doing so, he witnessed a full body apparition of a young girl wearing a pink dress with ruffled sleeves. White now believes that the girl was the one who was killed on the swing ride. Because she liked watching his tractor, he parked and left it for her to enjoy.

Robinson Middle School

Robinson Middle School is haunted by a female entity who roams through the school’s halls at night. During her haunts, she rattles the locks on the lockers.

Xinhai Tunnel

The Xinghai Tunnel connects central Taipei to the outer Taipei city of Muja. Built atop a hill that serves as a large cemetery, it is no wonder the tunnel is haunted. Those driving through the tunnel experience a gue dong chiang, a Chinese term for a phenomena that makes it seems as if you are trapped in a place and cannot get out of it. In the tunnel, drivers can see the end, but they can’t reach it no matter how fast they drive towards it.

The apparition of an elderly woman is often seen dusting and cleaning the road midway through the tunnel. Even despite the honking of drivers, she never stops cleaning and she refuses to move out of the way. However, when the car comes within a few feet away from her, she disappears.

Daveli’s Cave

Daveli’s Cave is surrounded by reports of paranormal, dating back to Ancient Greece. At that time, however, the phenomenon was recorded as being “Acts of the Gods”. The activity there includes UFOs, strange creatures, and spirits, most likely due to the high electromagnetic fields surrounding the area. The happenings are less frequent now.

Maroussi Cemetery

The Maroussi Cemetery is haunted by a crying girl. Visitors who pass by have seen her in the car mirror, but when they look back, she’s not there as if she has disappeared. She is called Anna.

Ho Chi Minh’s Former Residence

Ho Chi Minh’s home is believed to be haunted by mysterious beings. The story goes that during the Khmer Rouge battles and the Vietnam War, the beings were humans just going about their own business. However, they were killed suddenly, and then turned against humanity.