Denali National Park

“Denali” means “High One”, referring to one of the most sacred sites in North America – the 20,320-foot-tall Mount McKinley (named for President McKinley). The Athabascan natives believe that the mountain is home to Sa, the sun shaman who is considered to be the master of life itself; the legends date back centuries. Today, mystics consider Mount McKinley to be a transmitter of cosmic forces under the control of the Great White Brotherhood.

City Municipal Building

Built in 1899, the City Municipal Building was the first territorial court in Alaska, and now serves as the city hall and tourism department. The second floor (currently a museum) has been home to strange noises for decades; no one can seem to pinpoint the cause of the sounds.

Birchwood Saloon

Years ago, a young man, shoveling snow atop the roof to the building adjacent to the Birchwood Saloon, came into contact with a power line with the end of his shovel, electrocuting and killing him immediately.

Since then, both bartenders and patrons alike have heard voices, witnessed the jukebox play by itself, seen apparitions, and items moving by themselves. It is believed to be the spirit of the man who had the freak accident long ago.

Badarka Road

The story goes that many, many years ago, a little girl only five years of age was helping her father with chopping the wood for the fireplace while her mother and younger brother waited inside their small cabin.

To ensure his daughter wouldn’t fall down on the axe, her father put it into the tree Wanting to be helpful, the girl made attempts to pull it out to chop the wood herself. While her father was on break, she managed to pull the axe free, but she fell on it, hitting her in the head with the blade. She died instantly, blood running down her face.

Over the course of several days and nights, her father stayed by her body. He eventually died of hypothermia from Alaska’s cold winter air. Now, at 3:30 AM every morning, the apparition of the little girl can be seen in her father’s arms as he mourns her death.

Old Copper Railroad

Originally built as a railroad from Cordova to the Kennicott copper mine, the old copper railroad is now closed and covered with dirt. However, they are now used as a road to access the back of the Copper River.

Apparitions of gravestones have been seen along the dirt road in the woods, only to have them disappear on a second investigation. Between 1997 and 1998, construction on government housing began; the operation was cancelled due to the fact the construction workers kept hearing voices and the sound of children laughing, as well as having their tools moved around by an unseen entity.

Chuck’s Steak House

Chuck’s Steak House in Concord, New Hampshire has disembodied voices that come from the dining room and kitchen. The cause of the haunting is unknown, as are the identities of the spirits.

Dimond Center

The Dimond Center was built atop a several thousand-year-old sacred burial ground used by Native Alaskans. During the construction, workers digging in the ground discovered a few of the original graves, but continued working due to the age and size of the resting places. Today, the spirits of the natives, whose graves were desecrated, appear in front of lone people in the restrooms as well as the smaller hallways.

Courtyard by Marriott in Anchorage, Alaska

Room 201 of the Courtyard by Marriott in Anchorage, Alaska is haunted by a man who died there mysteriously, only to have his body be left undiscovered for several days. A spirit named “Ken” has been seen traversing the parking lot, courtyard, and near the gazebo. There is also the apparition of a cat that walks around the hotel, predominantly in Rooms 103 and 107.

Clark Middle School

Clark Middle School is believed to be haunted by the spirit of a woman wearing a white dress. Among her haunting activities are playing with the instruments in the band room, appearing in the empty halls during the summer months, and turning classroom lights on and off; she is considered a harmless spirit. A large number of teachers speak of a female ghost that floats through the floors, while others say there is no ghost at all.

Birch Hill Cemetery

The ghost of a young girl wearing an early 1900s white dress has been reported to walk through the Birch Hill Cemetery. A dark floating apparition and a little boy about seven or eight years old dressed in 1930s-era clothing have also been spotted.

Strawberry Hill Museum

Built as a mansion and later used as an orphanage, the Strawberry Hill Museum is now haunted by the spirits of the man and woman that originally lived in the house. The woman has appeared on two occasions: once walking down a church aisle (witnessed by two nuns at the alter) and the other time outside one of the museum’s windows when she asked where the priest’s house was.

The man has been seen only once, when a person visiting the museum’s third floor. Inside the closet was a man sitting, waving his hands in front of his face as if saying “Noooo!”.

As she ran down the stairs screaming, the man tapped her shoulder the entire way. She later identified him as a man in an old photograph from the museum.

Eloise Insane Asylum

Prior to operating as the Eloise Insane Asylum, the building served as the Wayne County Poor House, established in 1832. By 1834, it was in poor condition, and a new poorhouse was built in the Nankin Township.

On April 11th, 1839, thirty-five people were transferred from the old poorhouse to the new one, with one-hundred-eleven refusing to go into what they referred to as “the awful wilderness.”

On the same property was the Black Horse Tavern, which served as a stagecoach stop between Detroit and Chicago, a two-day trip. The tavern later became the keeper’s quarters. Between 1838 and 1839, a frame building was constructed to house the patients of the asylum. A kitchen was built along the back of the quarters in order to feed both families of the keeper and of the patients.