Irwin Army Community Hospital

The fire alarm at the Irwin Army Community Hospital has been known to go off on its own with no provocation. The alarm became such a hassle that the fire marshal and department disconnected the wires, as they became tired of going to reset the alarms.

Dejarnette Center

The Western Lunatic Asylum opened in 1825 as a hospital to treat the insane. In 1905, Dr. Joseph Dejarnette, a believer in eugenics, took over and renamed the asylum the Dejarnette Center. Dejarnette became abusive, and he tortured many of his patients. In 1996, the Dejarnette Center shut down.

Caritas Southwood Hospital

Caritas Southwood Hospital, which was formerly called Pondville State Hospital, closed to the public in 2003, but kept its cancer center open.  There have been numerous sightings of patients roaming the halls, including an elderly man on an elevator and a little girl down the hallway. Other activity includes disembodied footsteps, cold spots, and fuzzy white orbs. Currently, the hospital is heavily patrolled by police officers.

The Old Worcester State Hospital

The old Worcester State Hospital has blood stains on its walls, and is boarded up to prevent entry. From the outside, the sounds of screaming can be heard, believed to be coming from the spirits of the patients who died at the hospital. Today, Worcester State Hospital is heavily patrolled by the police. You need permission in order to access the building.

Maryville Center for Medically Complex Children

The Maryville Center for Medically Complex Children was built as an asylum for drug-addicted, handicapped, insane, and foster children. Due to asbestos, the center had to be shut down and boarded up.

Aradale Mental Hospital

The Aradale Mental Hospital (originally known as the Ararat Lunatic Asylum) was built in Ararat, Victoria, Australia. The asylum, along with its sister hospitals at Kew and Beechworth, were founded in order to take care of the growing number of “lunatics” residing in the area.

Linda Vista Community Hospital

The Linda Vista Community Hospital opened in 1904, and it featured its own miniature “farm” of cows, chickens, and a garden in order to provide the patients with fresh butter, milk, eggs, poultry, fruits, and vegetables. The original building was designed by Charles Whittlesy and opened under the name Santa Fe Coast Lines Hospital. It was razed and rebuilt in 1924, and, in 1937, was renamed the Linda Vista Community Hospital.

Jane Chin Hospital

The Jane Chin Hospital was built in Webb City, Missouri during the early 1900s. During the 1960s, it was abandoned, and it has remained that way ever since. Those who visit the place have reported strange lights, the sounds of gurneys being pushed through the halls, footsteps, and the voices of patients and doctors have been heard.

The Insane Asylum in Albuquerque, New Mexico

Though the owners of the abandoned asylum’s property are extremely strict about trespassers, a few have actually gotten in. Those who have entered have reported a large black cloud hovering above them. Some photographs even depict said cloud. The story goes that one patient became so uncontrollably insane that he massacred several doctors, nurses, and patients. It was forced to close down afterwards, as things weren’t quite the same.

Carrie Tingly Children’s Hospital

Carrie Tingly Children’s Hospital is said to have rooms that glow in the unused portion of the medical facility. People have reported being blocked by invisible force fields that make a static hissing noise when they are encountered. The apparitions of men in black robes can be seen in the halls, which are accompanied by the sound of crying, heartbeats, and voices.

Lakeville Hospital

The Lakeville Hospital was forced to close its doors to the public due to lack of funding. However, the undead are free to stay as long as they want. The windows on the front of the hospital have been seen getting spattered with blood even despite the fact no one is inside. Odd sounds of walking, running, crying, and screaming have been heard coming from the hospital as well, particularly on the third floor in the operating rooms.

Anoka State Hospital

Over the years, Anoka State Hospital has gone by many names – First State Asylum for the Insane, Anoka State Asylum, and most recently Anoka-Metro Regional Treatment Center (its current name). Built in 1898, it opened two years later in 1900, where it would serve as a patient-transfer hospital for the next fifty years.