Jerome Grand Hotel

Location: Jerome, Arizona, USA Built: Unknown Operation Time: ? – Present Type: Hotel Status: Open History: The cause of the hauntings at the Jerome Grand Hotel remains a mystery. The apparition of a woman in white has been seen roaming the halls. A ghostly nurse with a clipboard is seen in one of the hotel’s rooms. Lastly, the ghost…

Linda Vista Community Hospital

Location: Los Angeles, California, USA Built: 1904 (rebuilt in 1924) Operating Time: 1924 – 1991 Status: Turning into apartments History: The Linda Vista Community Hospital opened in 1904, and it featured its own miniature “farm” of cows, chickens, and a garden in order to provide the patients with fresh butter, milk, eggs, poultry, fruits, and vegetables. The…

Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital

Location: Jakarta, Indonesia, Asia Built: Unknown Operating Time: Unknown Status: Unknown History: Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital  (named for Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo, the hospital’s head doctor) in Jakarta, Indonesia is haunted by several entities, such as the doctor with a surgical knife with his hands covered in blood, the nurse who always alerts doctors of emergency patients, and various patients who died…

Waverly Hills Sanatorium

A portion of land was bought by Major Thomas H. Hays in 1883 and called it the Hays’ family home. Since the home was too far from any sort of school, Mr. Hays opened a local school so his daughters could learn.

The one-room schoolhouse soon had a teacher, Lizzie Lee Harris, to teach at it. Miss Harris, having enjoyed Walter Scott’s Waverley novels, entitled the school “Waverley School.” Mr. Hays liked the name, as it was peaceful-sounding, and he named his property Waverley Hill.

When the Board of Tuberculosis Hospitals bought the land, they kept the name and opened the sanatorium; it is unknown when or why the name’s spelling was changed from “Waverley” to “Waverly.” Waverly Hills Sanatorium opened as a tuberculosis hospital in 1910 and had a capacity of 40 to 50 patients.

At the beginning of the 20th century, a good portion of Jefferson County and Louisville had been infected with tuberculosis, a disease that affected the respiratory system. The swampland of Kentucky had created a large amount of TB bacteria, and much of the area was in danger.

As a measure to contain the deadly disease, a wooden sanatorium standing two-stories high opened. It consisted of an administrative building and two open-air pavilions, each capable of holding twenty patients. Eventually, the hospital was rebuilt after $25,000 in funding was given to create a hospital to take care of cases with pulmonary tuberculosis.

On August 31st, 1912, all of the TB patients in the old sanatorium were transferred into tents so the new hospital could be worked on. Waverly Hills reopened for the treatments of an additional forty patients in December of the same year. In 1914, the hospital expanded to have a children’s pavilion, providing fifty more beds.

The pavilion was used for children sick with tuberculosis as well as the healthy children of patients carrying disease, which caused more problems than solutions. At this point, the sanatorium’s goal was to add a new building each year. Since the wooden building was almost always in need of repair and more beds, construction on a five-story building capable of holding more than four hundred patients began on March 24th, 1924.

By October 17th, 1926, the new hospital opened for more patients. However, streptomycin, the TB vaccine, came around in 1943 and reduced the number of tuberculosis cases. This made Waverly Hills less of a necessity. All of the remaining patients in the hospital were sent to Hazelwood Sanatorium in Louisville.

Due to the lack of need, Waverly Hills closed its doors for good in June 1961. A year later in 1962, the building reopened as Woodhaven Geriatric Center, a nursing home for treating ageing patients with dementia, mobility issues, and mental disabilities. The center closed in 1982 due to patient negligence, which was not uncommon in understaffed and overcrowded hospitals like the Woodhaven Geriatric Center.

Agnews Developmental Center

Originally opening as the “Great Asylum for the Insane” in 1885, the center was the site of Santa Clara Valley’s greatest loss of life during the San Francisco quake of 1906. The patients who survived the ordeal escaped. There were 117 casualties, both patients and staff alike. Their bodies were buried in mass graves on site.

After the disaster, the asylum was rebuilt and reopened around 1911 as “Agnews State Mental Hospital”. The facility was like a self-contained town, as it included a farm that raised pigs and vegetables, a steam-generating power plant for heating, and a fire department.

The village had the largest population in the South San Francisco Bay area at the time, and it even had its own train station. The station remained there up until fire and vandalism led to its demolition in the 1990s. In 1926, Agnews opened a second campus two miles east of San Jose that was designed for people with developmental disabilities.

The center supported programs for the mentally ill up until 1972, when the facility converted over to exclusive care for people with developmental disabilities. The Agnews Developmental Center is believed to be haunted due to the tragedy of the 1906 quake, especially since the bodies were all buried in the same unmarked grave.