Third Bridge

The Third Bridge is said to have been the site of a massacre of Native Americans that resulted in several deaths. Because of this, the sound of war drums can be heard growing louder and louder as visitors sit on the bridge. Another apparition said to appear along the bridge is a ghost horse rider, who rides on the bridge.

In June 1997, a group of fifteen teenagers and one pre-teen spread between two cars decided to see the paranormal activity at the bridge for themselves. The first vehicle lost control at the top of the hill and crashed into the guardrail. After witnessing the accident, the driver of the second car made a desperate attempt to break but instead hit the gas pedal. They were forced into a tree, smashing the vehicle. The aftermath of the accident left two teens dead and the driver of the first car with permanent crippling injuries.

Third Bridge is haunted by both the dead teenagers and Native American victims.

Arkansas River (Pueblo, Colorado)

The Arkansas River in Pueblo, Colorado has been the site of a number of deaths. In more recent years, several Native American burial sites have been discovered along the banks of the river. Those who walk along the adjacent Pueblo Nature Trail have reported feelings of unease and the constant sensation of being watched or followed.

Lake Shawnee Amusement Park

In 1775, the first European settlers, led by Mitchell Clay, arrived in Princetown, West Virginia. Clay and his family worked together in farming on the land that would later become the Lake Shawnee Amusement Park. Their seemingly safe new life took a tragic turn in 1783. While the men were away hunting, Clay’s two children, Bartley and Tabitha, were attacked by Native Americans in the area. Bartley was murdered and scalped, and Tabitha was killed while trying to save her brother. Their younger brother, Ezekiel, was later kidnapped by the tribe. The men returned to find the children missing, and they took off after the third child.

The Natives took Ezekiel to Ohio, where they proceeded to burn his body at the stake shortly before the rescue group could catch up to them. After defeating the warriors, the search party took strips of skin off the Native Americans’ backs to use as razor straps; the trophies remained in the Clay family for years to come. The chief permitted Mitchell Clay to take the body of his son back home to be buried. The bodies of Bartley and Tabitha were exhumed so that they could be relocated to the hill behind the farmhouse where Ezekiel had been buried.

Two centuries later in 1926, C.T. Snidow purchased the property and turned it into Lake Shawnee Amusement Park; he was entirely unaware of the dark history that lingered on the site. The features of the park included a swimming pool, carnival rides, concession stands, a racetrack, a dance hall, occasional Wild West shows, and guest cabins. Very quickly, it became a popular summer vacation for families.

Tragedy struck again after a mother dropped her son off at the park one morning. When she returned later that afternoon, she found her son’s limp, lifeless body floating in the pool. In order to prevent any further accidents, the owners filled the pool with sand. A few years went by peacefully without any more accidents. During the early 1950s, a truck delivering soda to a drink concession stand accidentally backed up into the path of a swing ride operating at a high speed. The truck collided with one of the swings, killing the young girl riding in it. The fatalities caused the park to close in 1966.

Gaylord White, a former employee of the park, bought the abandoned Lake Shawnee Amusement Park in 1985 with plans to divide up the land and sell it as residential lots. However, his investment plan went south when he found a number of Native American burial sites and artifacts. Instead, he reopened the amusement park – but it only lasted for three years.

After some research, archaeologists discovered that two separate Native American settlements surrounded the area around Lake Shawnee before any European settlers arrived. In 1988, both the Marshall and Concord Colleges worked on digging around the area. They found that the settlements were arranged in a circular formation, and they were inhabited for a long period of time. However, they were believed to have been abandoned several hundreds of years before the settlers arrived. During their study, they found thirteen skeletons, most of them belonging to young children. There are as many as three thousand bodies buried on the property.

Today, the Ferris wheel, the swings, and several other rides remain at the park, which is haunted by a number of spirits. Paranormal activity includes orbs, disembodied voices and footsteps, Native American chanting, odd sounds, and the defunct carnival rides moving by themselves. A male apparition has been seen several times on one of the Ferris wheel cars (the one at the 9 o’clock position). The swings are said to have cold spots just above the wooden seats, which are known to move on their own.

Gaylord White reported having felt someone touching his shoulder or his arm from behind several times while working at the park. He also had a feeling of a presence washing him at the park. However, his most notable interaction was when he was clearing out brush from the field with his tractor shortly after purchasing the property. While doing so, he witnessed a full body apparition of a young girl wearing a pink dress with ruffled sleeves. White now believes that the girl was the one who was killed on the swing ride. Because she liked watching his tractor, he parked and left it for her to enjoy.

Mission Bottom

Mission Bottom, an old Native American school, was built along the outskirts of Wetumka, Oklahoma. Around 12:00 AM every night, a mysterious light navigates the top floor; the light could not be humanly produced, as the second floor was demolished several years ago.

Old Caddo Indian Museum

The Old Caddo Indian Museum has been out of operation for several years, but the building still remains. Among some of the artifacts were items found at burial sites in East Texas. Many of the museum’s visitors claim to have seen the ghost of a little girl standing alongside the road or next to the museum at night. She is believed to be a young Native American girl who was killed from a head injury. For many years, her skeleton was put on display in a glass case at the museum. While driving along the street in front of the museum, you can hear peculiar noises coming from the area.

Fort Abercrombie

Fort Abercrombie serves as the residence for ghosts of both soldiers and Native Americans. Established in 1857, it was built to protect the wagon trains that were heading west to California. In 1862, the fort was attacked by the Sioux Nation repeatedly, causing casualties on both sides that resulted in Fort Abercrombie’s hauntings.

Dracut State Forest

Dracut State Forest is haunted by ghosts who linger in the woods and tend to appear during Cutter Farm’s horseback trail rides. One of the spirits is a Native American man from the reservation who walks along the trails from sunset into the night. The sounds of screaming and whispering from young children can be heard, as well as the shouting of Native Americans.

The Paulding Light

In the valley just outside of Paulding, Michigan, there is a light that appears that is known as the Paulding Light. The first recorded sighting of the light was in 1966. A group of teenagers witnessed it and reported it to the sheriff. Several other people have seen the odd light since, as it occurs almost every night.

Hicks Road

Roughly ten years ago, a biker died on Hicks Road in an accident. He now haunts it, and his ghost is seen in a trench coat riding his bike, which has no wheels. It is also said you cannot see the man’s face, and you can only see him in your car’s mirrors.

Ship Creek

Ship Creek is haunted by a Native Alaskan woman named Marie, who was murdered along the creek in 1987. Now, she appears to homeless natives, warning them not to linger around, as that was how she was killed. Most of the sightings reported come from between the old ANS Hospital and the old Alaska Railroad terminal.

Indian Meadows and Shady Grove

Indian Meadows and Shady Grove are communities that were built over old Cherokee burial grounds, and they have had paranormal reports for the last twenty years. Dark figures have been seen in the woods at night. Those who go out for a walk during this time say that they can hear and feel presences following them, only to find that no one is there.

Interstate 65

Interstate 65 was built over sacred Creek Native American burial grounds, and the hills surrounding Evergreen are still spiritual homes for the nation. The land was so loved by the Creek nation that during the 1830s when they were being relocated, they said good-bye to each tree and hill.