Beach at Bethany

Bethany Beach is haunted by a ragged-looking military spirit in tattered clothing that roams along a stretch of the shore. Though uncertain, it is believed that the ghost is Eddie “Fast Eddie” Rickenbacker (b. October 8th, 1890), an Air Force/Army hero from World War I who died of pneumonia in Switzerland on July 23rd, 1973.

Fiddler’s Hall

In the late 19th century, two men were engaged in a bitter feud after they began courting the same woman. One man decided to scare the other late at night, hiding in a tree and armed with a fiddle. When the other suitor walked up the path to the house, the man in the tree started to play frightening noises on his instrument. While the prank was indeed successful, the fiddler met his fate after slipping from the tree and breaking his neck. Today, sounds of his phantom fiddling can be heard in the area.

Mangy Moose Saloon

Since 1980, employees and guests of the Mangy Moose Saloon have been witness to a polite apparition of a tall, thin man with a black mustache who haunts the bar and Room 18. Originally built as an officer’s quarters for Fort Liscomb, the lodge was later relocated to a new foundation in Tonsina during the 1920s.

In the 1950s, the Mangy Moose was run by Bill Ogden, who painted the building pink and operated a casino and bordello there; some believe that Bill is the ghost, as he died at the saloon, while others say it is a man who committed suicide there many years ago.

Circle Hot Springs Resort

The Circle Hot Springs Resort is haunted by the spirit of a woman. The paranormal activity of the resort includes disembodied footsteps, objects flying off the walls, and other odd happenings. The female apparition tends to wander the third floor library.

It is also haunted by the former owner, whose ghost does not like renovations. In the bar, beers have been moved by themselves. Disembodied footsteps can be heard on the porches of the rental cabins.

Birchwood Saloon

Years ago, a young man, shoveling snow atop the roof to the building adjacent to the Birchwood Saloon, came into contact with a power line with the end of his shovel, electrocuting and killing him immediately.

Since then, both bartenders and patrons alike have heard voices, witnessed the jukebox play by itself, seen apparitions, and items moving by themselves. It is believed to be the spirit of the man who had the freak accident long ago.

Badarka Road

The story goes that many, many years ago, a little girl only five years of age was helping her father with chopping the wood for the fireplace while her mother and younger brother waited inside their small cabin.

To ensure his daughter wouldn’t fall down on the axe, her father put it into the tree Wanting to be helpful, the girl made attempts to pull it out to chop the wood herself. While her father was on break, she managed to pull the axe free, but she fell on it, hitting her in the head with the blade. She died instantly, blood running down her face.

Over the course of several days and nights, her father stayed by her body. He eventually died of hypothermia from Alaska’s cold winter air. Now, at 3:30 AM every morning, the apparition of the little girl can be seen in her father’s arms as he mourns her death.

Courtyard by Marriott in Anchorage, Alaska

Room 201 of the Courtyard by Marriott in Anchorage, Alaska is haunted by a man who died there mysteriously, only to have his body be left undiscovered for several days. A spirit named “Ken” has been seen traversing the parking lot, courtyard, and near the gazebo. There is also the apparition of a cat that walks around the hotel, predominantly in Rooms 103 and 107.

Strawberry Hill Museum

Built as a mansion and later used as an orphanage, the Strawberry Hill Museum is now haunted by the spirits of the man and woman that originally lived in the house. The woman has appeared on two occasions: once walking down a church aisle (witnessed by two nuns at the alter) and the other time outside one of the museum’s windows when she asked where the priest’s house was.

The man has been seen only once, when a person visiting the museum’s third floor. Inside the closet was a man sitting, waving his hands in front of his face as if saying “Noooo!”.

As she ran down the stairs screaming, the man tapped her shoulder the entire way. She later identified him as a man in an old photograph from the museum.

Cuba Middle School

The Cuba Middle School’s gym is purportedly haunted by the spirit of a man named Joe Beisly. A former janitor, he fell off of a ladder to his death. His apparition is said to appear if his name is repeated three times.

Devils Elbow

The road nicknamed “Devils Elbow” is said to be haunted by demonic spirits. There is an apparition of a woman in white with glowing red eyes carrying a crying baby. While driving on the road, drivers often experience their headlights dimming or their car dying entirely.

Around 15 years ago, a man was murdered along Devils Elbow, though the road was haunted long before the tragic crime. Locals theorize that the evil spirits may have been behind it.

Third Bridge

The Third Bridge is said to have been the site of a massacre of Native Americans that resulted in several deaths. Because of this, the sound of war drums can be heard growing louder and louder as visitors sit on the bridge. Another apparition said to appear along the bridge is a ghost horse rider, who rides on the bridge.

In June 1997, a group of fifteen teenagers and one pre-teen spread between two cars decided to see the paranormal activity at the bridge for themselves. The first vehicle lost control at the top of the hill and crashed into the guardrail. After witnessing the accident, the driver of the second car made a desperate attempt to break but instead hit the gas pedal. They were forced into a tree, smashing the vehicle. The aftermath of the accident left two teens dead and the driver of the first car with permanent crippling injuries.

Third Bridge is haunted by both the dead teenagers and Native American victims.

Lake Shawnee Amusement Park

In 1775, the first European settlers, led by Mitchell Clay, arrived in Princetown, West Virginia. Clay and his family worked together in farming on the land that would later become the Lake Shawnee Amusement Park. Their seemingly safe new life took a tragic turn in 1783. While the men were away hunting, Clay’s two children, Bartley and Tabitha, were attacked by Native Americans in the area. Bartley was murdered and scalped, and Tabitha was killed while trying to save her brother. Their younger brother, Ezekiel, was later kidnapped by the tribe. The men returned to find the children missing, and they took off after the third child.

The Natives took Ezekiel to Ohio, where they proceeded to burn his body at the stake shortly before the rescue group could catch up to them. After defeating the warriors, the search party took strips of skin off the Native Americans’ backs to use as razor straps; the trophies remained in the Clay family for years to come. The chief permitted Mitchell Clay to take the body of his son back home to be buried. The bodies of Bartley and Tabitha were exhumed so that they could be relocated to the hill behind the farmhouse where Ezekiel had been buried.

Two centuries later in 1926, C.T. Snidow purchased the property and turned it into Lake Shawnee Amusement Park; he was entirely unaware of the dark history that lingered on the site. The features of the park included a swimming pool, carnival rides, concession stands, a racetrack, a dance hall, occasional Wild West shows, and guest cabins. Very quickly, it became a popular summer vacation for families.

Tragedy struck again after a mother dropped her son off at the park one morning. When she returned later that afternoon, she found her son’s limp, lifeless body floating in the pool. In order to prevent any further accidents, the owners filled the pool with sand. A few years went by peacefully without any more accidents. During the early 1950s, a truck delivering soda to a drink concession stand accidentally backed up into the path of a swing ride operating at a high speed. The truck collided with one of the swings, killing the young girl riding in it. The fatalities caused the park to close in 1966.

Gaylord White, a former employee of the park, bought the abandoned Lake Shawnee Amusement Park in 1985 with plans to divide up the land and sell it as residential lots. However, his investment plan went south when he found a number of Native American burial sites and artifacts. Instead, he reopened the amusement park – but it only lasted for three years.

After some research, archaeologists discovered that two separate Native American settlements surrounded the area around Lake Shawnee before any European settlers arrived. In 1988, both the Marshall and Concord Colleges worked on digging around the area. They found that the settlements were arranged in a circular formation, and they were inhabited for a long period of time. However, they were believed to have been abandoned several hundreds of years before the settlers arrived. During their study, they found thirteen skeletons, most of them belonging to young children. There are as many as three thousand bodies buried on the property.

Today, the Ferris wheel, the swings, and several other rides remain at the park, which is haunted by a number of spirits. Paranormal activity includes orbs, disembodied voices and footsteps, Native American chanting, odd sounds, and the defunct carnival rides moving by themselves. A male apparition has been seen several times on one of the Ferris wheel cars (the one at the 9 o’clock position). The swings are said to have cold spots just above the wooden seats, which are known to move on their own.

Gaylord White reported having felt someone touching his shoulder or his arm from behind several times while working at the park. He also had a feeling of a presence washing him at the park. However, his most notable interaction was when he was clearing out brush from the field with his tractor shortly after purchasing the property. While doing so, he witnessed a full body apparition of a young girl wearing a pink dress with ruffled sleeves. White now believes that the girl was the one who was killed on the swing ride. Because she liked watching his tractor, he parked and left it for her to enjoy.