Badarka Road

The story goes that many, many years ago, a little girl only five years of age was helping her father with chopping the wood for the fireplace while her mother and younger brother waited inside their small cabin.

To ensure his daughter wouldn’t fall down on the axe, her father put it into the tree Wanting to be helpful, the girl made attempts to pull it out to chop the wood herself. While her father was on break, she managed to pull the axe free, but she fell on it, hitting her in the head with the blade. She died instantly, blood running down her face.

Over the course of several days and nights, her father stayed by her body. He eventually died of hypothermia from Alaska’s cold winter air. Now, at 3:30 AM every morning, the apparition of the little girl can be seen in her father’s arms as he mourns her death.

Birch Hill Cemetery

The ghost of a young girl wearing an early 1900s white dress has been reported to walk through the Birch Hill Cemetery. A dark floating apparition and a little boy about seven or eight years old dressed in 1930s-era clothing have also been spotted.

Windigo

Windigo in Savoy, Massachusetts opened during the 1980s, and it is believed to be haunted by the spirits of six young girls and a woman. Legend has it that one of the camp’s councilors had gone insane, hanging three girls in a barn and drowning another three in a tub. After her rampage, she proceeded to commit suicide. Odd paranormal activity now surrounds the camp and the adjacent Winsor State Forest.

Theatre Guild of Webster Groves

The Webster Groves Theatre Guild is believed to be haunted by the spirit of a little girl. There, she is playful, enjoying tricking people during rehearsals; she roams around the upper portion of the theatre. In the basement, there is the ghost of an elderly woman that is said to frighten the little girl.

Camp Lulu

Camp Lulu in Brownsville, Texas was opened as a summer camp for young children. However, the nice getaway quickly turned sour after a counselor went insane and proceeded to rape and kill the girls. Now, the sounds of girls crying can be heard at night. The property owner works to preserve the souls of the young girls and shoots at anyone who trespasses.

Orpheum Theatre in Memphis, Tennessee

The Grande Opera House was built in 1890 on the corner of Main and Beale Street, and was deemed “the classiest theatre outside of New York City”. In 1907, it became part of the Orpheum Vaudeville circuit, which prompted the theater to be renamed the Orpheum Theatre. For nearly two decades, vaudeville remained popular and successful, drawing in large crowds.

Tragedy struck when twelve-year-old Mary was killed in an accident outside of the Orpheum Theatre in 1921. Two years later, a fire broke out during a show with singer Blossom Seeley, and the theater burned to the ground. It was rebuilt on the original site of The Grand in 1928 at the cost of $1.6 million. It was double the size of the old theater, and it featured new decorations and a Wurlitzer pipe organ.

In 1940, the Orpheum Theatre was purchased by the Malco movie theater chain, where they presented first-run movies. The theater remained in use until 1976, when Malco sold the building. Demolition was in store for the Orpheum, as there was talk of building an office complex in its place. However, the Memphis Development Foundation purchased it the following year, and they brought Broadway productions and concerts back to the theater.

On Christmas, 1982, a $4.7 million renovation project began to restore the Orpheum Theatre to how it looked back in 1928. A grand reopening took place in January 1984. Having survived all of its bankruptcies, a disastrous fire, and the threat of demolition, the Orpheum rose above it all to become a premier performing arts center. Called “The South’s Finest Theatre”, it presents more Broadway touring productions on an average annual basis than any other theater in the country.

Actor Yul Brynner, who was reputedly very psychic, saw the apparition of Mary, dressed in a 1920s style dress, sitting on the balcony in her favorite seat (CF). This was during the time that “The King and I” was playing – a play that Brynner was acting in. Cast members of “Fiddler on the Roof” spotted her in the same seat, seemingly enjoying the show; on opening night, a few of the actors and actresses held a séance on the balcony and actually made contact with Mary.

A woman and her fellow theater-goers witnessed Mary’s apparition, whom they described as “a 12-year-old girl in an old-fashioned white dress dancing in the lobby”. Before their eyes, she appeared and subsequently vanished. Mary also made her presence known to a theater workman and a housekeeper. While she never made an appearance in either situation, the workman described the sensation of her presence as a “cold, eerie feeling, like getting into a bathtub of cold liver”. As for the housekeeper, she played pranks on him by taking his tools and throwing them in the toilet.

Other workmen reported seeing a theater door burst open in an outward direction, then proceed to shut itself without the assistance of a living person or wind. Late one night, a repairman was working on a malfunctioning organ. He became frustrated and decided to take a coffee break. Having locked everything up, he was surprised to find upon his return that an unseen entity had fixed the organ.

On a different night, the night watchman accidentally locked up a vagrant man in the 5th-floor gallery. The watchman was startled when he heard the sound of a terrified scream and footsteps running down five flights of stairs in the total darkness. The homeless man burst through the front doors, knocking them off their hinges. It is unknown what he saw that frightened him. In another instance, the theater’s alarm went off, and police with canine units arrived to investigate. The highly trained dogs refused to enter the building, unwilling to budge as if they sensed some sort of presence that the human handlers didn’t.

Lake Shawnee Amusement Park

In 1775, the first European settlers, led by Mitchell Clay, arrived in Princetown, West Virginia. Clay and his family worked together in farming on the land that would later become the Lake Shawnee Amusement Park. Their seemingly safe new life took a tragic turn in 1783. While the men were away hunting, Clay’s two children, Bartley and Tabitha, were attacked by Native Americans in the area. Bartley was murdered and scalped, and Tabitha was killed while trying to save her brother. Their younger brother, Ezekiel, was later kidnapped by the tribe. The men returned to find the children missing, and they took off after the third child.

The Natives took Ezekiel to Ohio, where they proceeded to burn his body at the stake shortly before the rescue group could catch up to them. After defeating the warriors, the search party took strips of skin off the Native Americans’ backs to use as razor straps; the trophies remained in the Clay family for years to come. The chief permitted Mitchell Clay to take the body of his son back home to be buried. The bodies of Bartley and Tabitha were exhumed so that they could be relocated to the hill behind the farmhouse where Ezekiel had been buried.

Two centuries later in 1926, C.T. Snidow purchased the property and turned it into Lake Shawnee Amusement Park; he was entirely unaware of the dark history that lingered on the site. The features of the park included a swimming pool, carnival rides, concession stands, a racetrack, a dance hall, occasional Wild West shows, and guest cabins. Very quickly, it became a popular summer vacation for families.

Tragedy struck again after a mother dropped her son off at the park one morning. When she returned later that afternoon, she found her son’s limp, lifeless body floating in the pool. In order to prevent any further accidents, the owners filled the pool with sand. A few years went by peacefully without any more accidents. During the early 1950s, a truck delivering soda to a drink concession stand accidentally backed up into the path of a swing ride operating at a high speed. The truck collided with one of the swings, killing the young girl riding in it. The fatalities caused the park to close in 1966.

Gaylord White, a former employee of the park, bought the abandoned Lake Shawnee Amusement Park in 1985 with plans to divide up the land and sell it as residential lots. However, his investment plan went south when he found a number of Native American burial sites and artifacts. Instead, he reopened the amusement park – but it only lasted for three years.

After some research, archaeologists discovered that two separate Native American settlements surrounded the area around Lake Shawnee before any European settlers arrived. In 1988, both the Marshall and Concord Colleges worked on digging around the area. They found that the settlements were arranged in a circular formation, and they were inhabited for a long period of time. However, they were believed to have been abandoned several hundreds of years before the settlers arrived. During their study, they found thirteen skeletons, most of them belonging to young children. There are as many as three thousand bodies buried on the property.

Today, the Ferris wheel, the swings, and several other rides remain at the park, which is haunted by a number of spirits. Paranormal activity includes orbs, disembodied voices and footsteps, Native American chanting, odd sounds, and the defunct carnival rides moving by themselves. A male apparition has been seen several times on one of the Ferris wheel cars (the one at the 9 o’clock position). The swings are said to have cold spots just above the wooden seats, which are known to move on their own.

Gaylord White reported having felt someone touching his shoulder or his arm from behind several times while working at the park. He also had a feeling of a presence washing him at the park. However, his most notable interaction was when he was clearing out brush from the field with his tractor shortly after purchasing the property. While doing so, he witnessed a full body apparition of a young girl wearing a pink dress with ruffled sleeves. White now believes that the girl was the one who was killed on the swing ride. Because she liked watching his tractor, he parked and left it for her to enjoy.

Robinson Middle School

Robinson Middle School is haunted by a female entity who roams through the school’s halls at night. During her haunts, she rattles the locks on the lockers.

Maroussi Cemetery

The Maroussi Cemetery is haunted by a crying girl. Visitors who pass by have seen her in the car mirror, but when they look back, she’s not there as if she has disappeared. She is called Anna.

School: University of Puget Sound

Location: Tacoma, Washington, USA Built: Unknown Operation Time: ? – Present Type: College (University) Status: Open History The  University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington is home to a tale of abduction and murder. During the night of August 31st, 1961, eight-year-old Ann Marie Burr went missing from her bedroom in her house on N. 14th…

Road: Oakglen Road

Location: Yucaipa, California, USA Built: Unknown Type: Road Status: Open History Oakglen Road was home to an elderly woman whom locals deemed a witch. She was believed to have put a curse on the area; many believed that the cause of a tragic accident leading to the death of a group of teenagers was the curse. Now, it…