Linda Vista Community Hospital

The Linda Vista Community Hospital opened in 1904, and it featured its own miniature “farm” of cows, chickens, and a garden in order to provide the patients with fresh butter, milk, eggs, poultry, fruits, and vegetables. The original building was designed by Charles Whittlesy and opened under the name Santa Fe Coast Lines Hospital. It was razed and rebuilt in 1924, and, in 1937, was renamed the Linda Vista Community Hospital.

Eastern State Penitentiary

The Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania opened in 1829 with some of the USA’s most infamous criminals entering the facility over the course of its operation (such as Al Capone and Willie Sutton).

Bird Cage Theatre

The Bird Cage Theatre belonged to William “Billy” and Lottie Hutchinson. Opening on December 26th, 1881, the name came from the fourteen boxes called “cages” that were located on the two balconies on either side of the central hall. The cages were mostly used for prostitutes, and drapes could be drawn in front of them for while they entertained their clients.

Ashmore Estates

The Ashmore Estates has been haunted for several years, and it was off-limits to the public for twenty years. For a long while (from 1987 to 2006), the building was abandoned. Built in 1916, the three-story brick building was built on the Country Poor Farm. The residents that lived there had little to nothing in their possession. The home remained a poor farm until 1956, when the house was transformed into a center for the mentally disabled.

Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum

The Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum (which is also known as the “Armand Auclerc Weston State Hospital”) was built under the standards of the Kirkbride Plan. In the 1850s the Virginia General Assembly authorized the hospital. In order to build such an asylum, they consulted Thomas Story Kirkbride, the man behind the Kirkbride Plan as well as the superintendent of the Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane.

Waverly Hills Sanatorium

A portion of land was bought by Major Thomas H. Hays in 1883 and called it the Hays’ family home. Since the home was too far from any sort of school, Mr. Hays opened a local school so his daughters could learn.

The one-room schoolhouse soon had a teacher, Lizzie Lee Harris, to teach at it. Miss Harris, having enjoyed Walter Scott’s Waverley novels, entitled the school “Waverley School.” Mr. Hays liked the name, as it was peaceful-sounding, and he named his property Waverley Hill.

When the Board of Tuberculosis Hospitals bought the land, they kept the name and opened the sanatorium; it is unknown when or why the name’s spelling was changed from “Waverley” to “Waverly.” Waverly Hills Sanatorium opened as a tuberculosis hospital in 1910 and had a capacity of 40 to 50 patients.

At the beginning of the 20th century, a good portion of Jefferson County and Louisville had been infected with tuberculosis, a disease that affected the respiratory system. The swampland of Kentucky had created a large amount of TB bacteria, and much of the area was in danger.

As a measure to contain the deadly disease, a wooden sanatorium standing two-stories high opened. It consisted of an administrative building and two open-air pavilions, each capable of holding twenty patients. Eventually, the hospital was rebuilt after $25,000 in funding was given to create a hospital to take care of cases with pulmonary tuberculosis.

On August 31st, 1912, all of the TB patients in the old sanatorium were transferred into tents so the new hospital could be worked on. Waverly Hills reopened for the treatments of an additional forty patients in December of the same year. In 1914, the hospital expanded to have a children’s pavilion, providing fifty more beds.

The pavilion was used for children sick with tuberculosis as well as the healthy children of patients carrying disease, which caused more problems than solutions. At this point, the sanatorium’s goal was to add a new building each year. Since the wooden building was almost always in need of repair and more beds, construction on a five-story building capable of holding more than four hundred patients began on March 24th, 1924.

By October 17th, 1926, the new hospital opened for more patients. However, streptomycin, the TB vaccine, came around in 1943 and reduced the number of tuberculosis cases. This made Waverly Hills less of a necessity. All of the remaining patients in the hospital were sent to Hazelwood Sanatorium in Louisville.

Due to the lack of need, Waverly Hills closed its doors for good in June 1961. A year later in 1962, the building reopened as Woodhaven Geriatric Center, a nursing home for treating ageing patients with dementia, mobility issues, and mental disabilities. The center closed in 1982 due to patient negligence, which was not uncommon in understaffed and overcrowded hospitals like the Woodhaven Geriatric Center.

Bobby Mackey’s Music World

Bobby Mackey’s Music World is a nightclub currently owned by country singer Bobby Mackey. It has been dubbed “the most haunted nightclub in the USA” by Mackey. Urban legends and folklore say it is the “gateway to hell”. One of the nightclub’s resident spirits is Pearl Bryan, whose body was found in a field several miles away from the club. Rumor has it that Bryan’s murderers were Satanists who cursed the location and vowed to haunt everyone involved in the prosecution of the case.

Another ghost is that of Johanna, a 1930s dancer who got pregnant when she wasn’t married. She committed suicide in her dressing room in the Latin Quarter Club (now Bobby Mackey’s). Although there is no record of it, it is believed that she killed herself after her father murdered her lover, who was a singer at the club.

While both tales are merely rumors, there are some who believe in the connection to the place while others don’t. According to Bobby Mackey, the site was a slaughterhouse in the early 19th century that was later demolished to build a roadhouse. He purchased it in 1978.