Hill Park

Hill Park is a private historical cemetery dedicated to the American Civil War. Frank James and two other Confederate soldiers are buried there. Reports of an apparition have been made, and it is believed to be the spirit of a soldier who was killed during a battle in either 1862 or 1864.

Sanders Valley

Sanders Valley was the site of a barn belonging to a family during the Civil War. While the war was going on, a group of Union soldiers killed the family living on the farm because they were southern sympathizers. The story goes that the women and children were cast into the old cistern, the father was dragged around the valley to death, and the slave was hung in the barn. Now, on nights with full moons, the apparition of the slave can be seen swinging from the rafters. Children can be heard laughing.

Grace Hall

Grace Hall was built in 1857 by Henry Ware as an antebellum mansion in neoclassicism and Victorian style. During the Civil War, much of the city of Selma was damaged or destroyed, but many of the architecturally buildings were left intact (including Grace Hall and Sturdivant Hall). Currently, Grace Hall is owned by Coy and Joey Dillon, and it is operated as a bed and breakfast. It is open for tours, parties, business meetings, and assorted social events.

La Posada Hotel

The La Posada Hotel (which means The Inn Hotel) in Santa Fe has the historic Staab House as its centerpiece. The mansion was built in 1882 by an old Santa Fe Trail merchant. Abraham Staab had earned a great deal of money from his days as a major supply contractor for the Union Army during the Civil War. He and his wife Julia built the mansion together, decorating it with European materials and furnishings.

Fort Dodge

Fort Dodge is currently used as a retirement home for veterans. One building at the fort is the home of many spirits who are assumed to be soldiers.

Fort Jefferson

Fort Jefferson (named for President Thomas Jefferson) began construction in 1846. The already existing lighthouse on the island remained with in the fort’s walls up until it was demolished in 1877. A massive design, the fort featured two sides that measured 325 ft. and two walls that measured 477 ft. Heavy guns were mounted onto the sides of Fort Jefferson’s walls.

Fort Davis National Historic Site

Fort Davis was used as a Confederate fort in 1861 during the Civil War. During this time, a woman named Alice Walpole stopped by the area to search for roses along Limpia Creek when she was abducted by members of the Apache tribe. Though her body was never found, her spirit began to appear in the area, indicating she had been killed.

Fort Abercrombie

Fort Abercrombie serves as the residence for ghosts of both soldiers and Native Americans. Established in 1857, it was built to protect the wagon trains that were heading west to California. In 1862, the fort was attacked by the Sioux Nation repeatedly, causing casualties on both sides that resulted in Fort Abercrombie’s hauntings.

Fort Fisher

Confederate General William Whiting was fatally wounded during an attack on Fort Fisher by the Union in 1864. The fort protected the last remaining river route used by blockade runners who supplied the Confederacy with the goods they needed. With the Union taking the stronghold, the war was practically won.

Fort Lincoln

During the Civil War, Fort Lincoln was the site of the abuse and mistreatment of several Confederate soldiers who were imprisoned there. They were often kept in small tents in wet and filthy conditions. Over 4,000 Confederate soldiers died at the fort in the course of two years, either of disease or of abuse.

Oak Alley Plantation

The plantation, which was originally named Bon Séjour Plantation (meaning “good living”), was built to grow sugar cane. The mansion that stands today was built by slaves under the command of George Swainy between 1837 and 1839 for Jacques Telesphore Roman.

Pickens County Courthouse

During the Civil War, the first courthouse in Carrollton was burned downed by the Union Army during the Civil War; this was done as an act of humiliation rather than an attack. The second built courthouse, the Carrollton Courthouse caught fire and burned down on November 16th, 1876. The cause of the blaze is still unknown to this day. The third courthouse’s construction began. Everyone blamed a rowdy African-American man named Henry Wells, who lived outside of town for the fire. The sheriff arrested him and locked him up in the attic of a building that would become the new courthouse.