Black Death Hospital

The Black Death Hospital in Roscrea, Ireland is reputed as being one of the most haunted hospitals in the world. It was used as a children’s hospital for those suffering from the “black death”, or the bubonic plague. Several years ago, construction workers were digging around sewer pipes when they were surprised to find the bones of nearly fifty children. Locals refuse to visit the hospital at night, claiming that the ghosts of the children will lure you to your death to join them.

Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital

Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital  (named for Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo, the hospital’s head doctor) in Jakarta, Indonesia is haunted by several entities, such as the doctor with a surgical knife with his hands covered in blood, the nurse who always alerts doctors of emergency patients, and various patients who died there. They generally walk around at night, and make their presence known if there is a visitor.

Plunkett Hospital

Plunkett Hospital is currently being considered for renovations to turn the hospital into condos for senior citizens. However, it is said to be haunted, having several odd happening surround it. Sounds of blood-curdling screams and apparitions of patients who died at the hospital are just some of them. Now, the windows and doors are boarded up to prevent the sensation of being watched by the spirits, as many passersby have reported.

Manor Grove Nursing Home

The residents of Manor Grove Nursing Home that suffer from dementia and Alzheimer’s have complained of a little boy who plays in their room at night and tends to wake them up. It is said that it is the ghost of a little boy who was killed on the nearby railroad tracks during the 1950s or 60s.

St. Louis City Hospital

The Old City Hospital, more widely known as the St. Louis City Hospital, was the city’s primary public hospital and, for most of the 20th century, ran as a multi-level and multi-building complex. By 1970, it had reached a total of twelve buildings, seven of which remain today.

Glenn Dale Hospital in Glenn Dale, Maryland

The Glenn Dale Hospital was very successful in the early 1900s, but it was abandoned in the 1970s. It was made up of six different buildings on opposite sides of the road, but the hauntings seem to take place in the two structures that lay closest to the road on the right. To add to the already disturbing appearance of the hospital, most of the doors have been broken. Unused medical equipment has been abandoned within the walls of the Glenn Dale Hospital.

Waverly Hills Sanatorium

A portion of land was bought by Major Thomas H. Hays in 1883 and called it the Hays’ family home. Since the home was too far from any sort of school, Mr. Hays opened a local school so his daughters could learn.

The one-room schoolhouse soon had a teacher, Lizzie Lee Harris, to teach at it. Miss Harris, having enjoyed Walter Scott’s Waverley novels, entitled the school “Waverley School.” Mr. Hays liked the name, as it was peaceful-sounding, and he named his property Waverley Hill.

When the Board of Tuberculosis Hospitals bought the land, they kept the name and opened the sanatorium; it is unknown when or why the name’s spelling was changed from “Waverley” to “Waverly.” Waverly Hills Sanatorium opened as a tuberculosis hospital in 1910 and had a capacity of 40 to 50 patients.

At the beginning of the 20th century, a good portion of Jefferson County and Louisville had been infected with tuberculosis, a disease that affected the respiratory system. The swampland of Kentucky had created a large amount of TB bacteria, and much of the area was in danger.

As a measure to contain the deadly disease, a wooden sanatorium standing two-stories high opened. It consisted of an administrative building and two open-air pavilions, each capable of holding twenty patients. Eventually, the hospital was rebuilt after $25,000 in funding was given to create a hospital to take care of cases with pulmonary tuberculosis.

On August 31st, 1912, all of the TB patients in the old sanatorium were transferred into tents so the new hospital could be worked on. Waverly Hills reopened for the treatments of an additional forty patients in December of the same year. In 1914, the hospital expanded to have a children’s pavilion, providing fifty more beds.

The pavilion was used for children sick with tuberculosis as well as the healthy children of patients carrying disease, which caused more problems than solutions. At this point, the sanatorium’s goal was to add a new building each year. Since the wooden building was almost always in need of repair and more beds, construction on a five-story building capable of holding more than four hundred patients began on March 24th, 1924.

By October 17th, 1926, the new hospital opened for more patients. However, streptomycin, the TB vaccine, came around in 1943 and reduced the number of tuberculosis cases. This made Waverly Hills less of a necessity. All of the remaining patients in the hospital were sent to Hazelwood Sanatorium in Louisville.

Due to the lack of need, Waverly Hills closed its doors for good in June 1961. A year later in 1962, the building reopened as Woodhaven Geriatric Center, a nursing home for treating ageing patients with dementia, mobility issues, and mental disabilities. The center closed in 1982 due to patient negligence, which was not uncommon in understaffed and overcrowded hospitals like the Woodhaven Geriatric Center.