Kukelhan Mansion


The Kukelhaan Mansion in Decatur, Indiana

Decatur, Indiana

BUILT: Unknown
STATUS: Demolished

History

During the early 20th century, the Kukelhan Mansion belonged to Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Kukelhan, the property’s namesake. They lived there with their seven children, one girl and six boys.

In November 1907, the couple was on their way to visit some friends in New Haven, Indiana when tragedy struck. While passing through the small village of Maples, Indiana, they were killed when their buggy was hit by a Pennsylvania Railroad train. Following their untimely demise, the children continued to reside on the property, leaving their daughter, the eldest child, to raise her brothers.

It is said that anyone who attempted to live in the house had to leave due to the paranormal activity they experienced there.

Several sources claim a much more sensational story, stating that the Kukelhan Mansion belonged to a wealthy banker who went insane, believing that someone was after his money. He was to have slaughtered his family before hanging himself. However, this story is only urban legend and is entirely false, with the Kukelhan family adamantly refuting these claims. Unfortunately, this version of the tale led to visitors vandalizing and damaging the property beyond repair, which ultimately required the mansion’s demolition in 2011.

All traces of the mansion have been removed. A new house has been built on the property and there have been no signs of paranormal activity since.


Sources

  1. Forgotten USA. “The Kukelhan Mansion,” www.ForgottenUSA.org

More

HELP SUPPORT GHOSTLY WORLD

For just $1.00 (or more), you can help us keep Ghostly World operating. Your support allows us to provide our content online for readers across the world. Thank you for helping Ghostly World!

$1.00

Advertisements

One Comment Add yours

  1. Vincent O'Neal says:

    What happened to all of Mr. Kukelhans money when killed himself.

    Like

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.